The Origins of Sash Windows

Sash windows date back to the 17th century, and evidence suggests they originated in England, although the term “sash” comes from the French word “chassis,” which means frame. Sash windows are found in many historical buildings as well as Georgian, Victorian, and Edwardian era homes.

The first known sash windows were used in Royal establishments such as the Hampton Court and Kensington Palaces. They were considered a status symbol amongst the upper class. Older homes featuring casement windows were renovated to feature sash windows and take advantage of the functionality of the windows as well as aesthetics.

Over the centuries, many improvements have been made upon sash windows and there are several designs available. For a bulk of the sash window history, the six over six pane style was the most popular, though you can find single and double hung as well as horizontal sliding sash windows.

While sash windows have an initial expense associated with installation or restoration, the long-term durability and energy cost savings makes it a worthwhile investment. Some of the benefits of sash windows are the minor costs of upkeep, which minimizes the likelihood of ongoing repair. The windows functions can shield your home from dust and ambient noise, as offer certain security features. Then, of course, there are the savings on heating and air conditioning costs due to the increased air circulation that sash windows provide. Property value is well protected with the installation or renovation and maintenance of sash windows.

Sash windows fell out of popular use for a period of time as other types of windows became standard for new construction. There has been a 21st century resurgence of interest in sash windows due to renewed interest in energy conservation and appreciation for fine craftsmanship. More often, existing sash windows are being restored and new installations of sash windows are in demand.